Why Endangered?

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Narwhal Endangerment Level

Narwhal Endangerment Level

Narwhals have been listed as “Nearly Threatened” since 2008. Very few laws have been proposed in attempts to protect this interesting species. In an effort to support conservation, the European Union established an import ban on tusks. Narwhals are becoming extinct for three main reasons. The primary catalyst for the series of events that have led to decrease narwhal populations is unprecedentedly rapid climate change.

Thousands of years of evolution have prepared an Arctic species like the narwhal for life on and around the sea ice. Because of climate change, this ice cover has dramatically decreased in both extent and thickness, at a rate far too quick for a species to adapt. A narwhal relies on sea ice for a place to feed and a place to take refuge—occasionally even a place to hide from predators. An additional result of climate change is the reduction in the population of the Narwhal’s primary prey, the Greenland halibut.

The Melting Ice Of The Arctic

The Melting Ice Of The Arctic

Also encumbering rehabilitation efforts for the narwhal species is the increase in oil and gas development. The increased shipping of oil and gas has lead to increased vehicular movement in sensitive areas. In addition to the possibility of fatal oil spills, collisions between boats and many species of marine life are certain to occur. Also, shipping, marine construction and military activities cause an increase in noise pollution. Whales, as well as many other marine species, rely heavily on sound for communication. This new interference by noise pollution can negatively affect a narwhal’s ability to find food and mates, navigate, avoid predators and take care of their young. “Man-made noise affects sea creatures like putting a bucket on your head. It cuts off the senses they need to survive. When they can’t hear, they can’t live” (http://dontbeabuckethead.org). 

Finally, hunting with modern equipment represents the most long-standing and consistent threat to narwhals throughout their habitat-range.

Feel Free To Watch This Video About The Unnecessary Endangerment Of The Beluga Whale And Narwhal!

The Human Involvement In The Endangerment Of Narwhals

Sea Ice Melting In The Narwhal Habitat

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19 responses to “Why Endangered?

  1. This page also has great information, but there are a few places where you should change how you are presenting the information. Some of the sentence structures need to be fixedr. Come in and let me point out what I mean. There is one main issue I have with this page, you video (which excellent, shows how hunting Narwhals for their tusks has decimated their populations, but hunting is not mentioned in your text. You need to add hunting as one of the main reasons why Narwals are endangered. You earned 23/25 pts for checkpoint #3. – Steve L.

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  2. Please forgive all the typos in my previous comment! I was falling asleep while writing it.

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  3. It would appear from the USFW service that the Narwal is not an Endangered Species.

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    • As seen in the image atop the page (which can be found on the WWF website), Narwhals are listed as “Nearly Threatened,” and have been since 2008 (see first sentence of page).

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  4. My far the biggest endanger to the Narwal is Global warming.

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    • As written within the text’s body on the page: “The primary catalyst for the series of events that have led to decrease narwhal populations is unprecedentedly rapid climate change.”

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  5. MY step dad doesn’t believe in narwhals

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    • Though narwhals are one of the most majestic and mysterious animals to ever swim the oceans, they are, in fact, real—they have really lived, and, unfortunately, really died. Tell your step-dad to visit the website to learn more and help the cause ;)!

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    • This must be joke, right? How can anyone be so stupid as to not “believe” in narwhals? Something which a simple 10 second Google search would confirm to exist. Jacob Dahan is a very nice person to have taken the time to respond to such a comment in all seriousness!

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      • Narwhals are indeed quite rare! Many people do not of their existence. I believe that’s what Christian meant by “believe.” Either way, it’s easy to see why somebody may find an animal as majestic as the “Unicorn of the Sea” to be the work of fiction instead of science. And this is why we must preserve the Narwhal: So our entire population can share in it’s beauty!

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  6. its sad how people take narwhals for granted. they think its ok for them to kill them and not do anything about them. i might be a kid but i care about the world. im doing research on this great animal and it makes me sad to read this

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    • It is truly sad, but anybody can make a difference! Tell your friends, tell your family, spread the word! Invite them to visit this website and others like it to learn about this amazing species. I’m sure your research will help you further your appreciation for the majestic Narwhal!

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  7. thank you for this advice.Indeed I will spread the word. This animal needs all the HELP it can get. I just saw a man with a head of a narwhal it almost made me cry X_X^o^😢

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  8. Yes.thank you for the advice.AH!narwhales are my favorite whale.so sad.the video almost made me cried.hope we can put a stop to hunting animals just for their body parts. WE ARE RUNNING OUT OF ANIMALS!please put a stop to this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!(if you kill and cut of the rhino horn,grind it and mix with water,you should just use your fingernail

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  9. This was very helpful on a repot I’m doing on narwhals!! Thanks!!!

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  10. Great website! It really helped with my homework and now I feel sad after reading this!:-( ^0^=sad face

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  11. holy. that is sad

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  12. Pingback: Endangered Animal Picture’s – Site Title

  13. Pingback: Great Narwhal | Momus News

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